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All about cruise ships

Posted on April 18, 2015 by in Jobs & Economy

Economic benefits claimed:

http://www.port-of-charleston.com/UnionPierPlan/pdf/cruisestudy.pdf

Currently 16 port-of-calls and 53 origination cruises have been booked at the SCSPA for 2010. Based upon the survey results, it is estimated that the passengers on ships that will make Charleston a port-or-call, 66.49% will leave the ship and visit the City which will amount to 11,303 additional tourists.

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Of these visitors, one-half will debark on escorted motor coach tours from the ship to tour the region’s attractions while the other one-half will visit the city independently. Passenger spending is estimated to be $5,552,496, while crew members are estimated to spend $2,606,575. Cruise line companies will spend an estimated $14,143,535 in direct spending.

A study done by College of Charleston professors Dr. John Crotts and Dr. Frank Hefner estimates the total economic output at more than $37 million for the Tri-County area. This estimate includes approximately 407 jobs to the area that contribute $16.2 million in salaries and wages and $3.5 million in state sales and income taxes.

Currently 16 port-of-calls and 53 origination cruises have been booked at the SCSPA for 2010. Based upon the survey results, it is estimated that the passengers on ships that will make Charleston a port-or-call, 66.49% will leave the ship and visit the City which will amount to 11,303 additional tourists.

1Of these visitors, one-half will debark on escorted motor coach tours from the ship to tour the region’s attractions while the other one-half will visit the city independently. Passenger spending is estimated to be $5,552,496, while crew members are estimated to spend $2,606,575. Cruise line companies will spend an estimated $14,143,535 in direct spending.

Garbage:

In order to minimize the amount of waste generated, cruise lines have aggressively implemented waste management programs that actually reduce the creation of waste.  In the last 10 years alone, cruise ships have cut waste and garbage almost in half, despite a growth in cruise capacity averaging 7.6% annually.  In addition, according to the EPA, the U.S. population recycles an average of 28% of its waste per year.  Cruise ships are reducing their waste stream and still recycling anywhere from 25-80%, depending on the ship — significantly higher than that of most local communities.  This further reduces the amount of waste that requires disposal.

Emissions:

To address emissions from the cruise ships themselves, in October 2008 the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) agreed to revise and strengthen the emission standards in Annex VI and reduce the amount of sulfur in ship’s fuel. The revised law will enter force in July 2010. The current global limit on sulfur in marine fuels is 4.5 per cent. Under the revised Annex this limit will fall in two stages to 3.5 per cent in 2012, and finally to 0.5 per cent in 2020 subject to a review in 2018. (top of page)

What about shoreside power, or plugging in, the cruise ships while they’re at dock?

Given the current technology, costs and trade-offs, shorepower does not seem to offer an attractive environmental benefit at this time.  However, we will continue to monitor the technology in the future as it improves and develops.

The electric load required to support a cruise ship while at dock is significant.  This electricity has to come from the grid, so the emissions from the associated power plant and available capacity have to be considered.

While two cruise terminals on the West Coast have installed shore side plug-in capabilities for ships, shoreside power is a very new and very costly technology.  It can cost up to $10 million to retrofit a berth and $1-2 million for each ship.

On March 26, the IMO designated a 230-mile area around the U.S. coast as an Emission Control Area (ECA), dramatically reducing ship-related emissions and eliminating the need to consider shore power. The EPA estimates this move reduces sulfur content in fuel by 98% – cuts particulate matter by 85%, and NOx by 80%. The new standards go into effect in 2011, with implementations in 2012 and 2015. (top of page)

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Master’s thesis, Columbia U.:

 

Cruise ship fees and head taxes—Port authorities and managers can charge cruise ships pership

or per-passenger fees that are carefully calculated to offset the cost of port operations,

services, maintenance, and security while not overcharging ships.

Whether court-ordered or not, SPA and Charleston should pause the Union Pier project and onduct and invest in, baseline studies and assessments of the potential impacts on the overall environment, economy, and community, including historic and cultural resources. As public agencies with the decision-making power, they should have a clear understanding of the costs and benefits to all major stakeholders. Towards these goals, SPA and Charleston can work with the community and preservation professionals to establish limits of acceptable change (LAC), develop a clear definition of neighborhood character, and an inventory of potentially impacted tangible and intangible heritage resources. Environmental and heritage impact studies can help with this process. Cruise ships have a potential benefit to port cities, and establishing limits of acceptable change will allow Charleston to benefit from the cruise industry while minimizing and mitigating the detrimental aspects of cruise ship tourism.

In order to establish limits of acceptable change, Charleston should follow the four-part process described in Chapter 2.

Cruise companies or

Port authorities can create or set aside a portion of fee and tax revenue for infrastructure, ommunity, and environment funds. These funds can be used for the preservation and restoration of historic and cultural resources.

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Seventy cruise ships come to Charleston annual, bringing 250,000 visitors.

discharge untreated sewage and garbage ground to one inch pieces when they are 3 miles out.

The planned and hotly disputed $25 million Charleston terminal for cruise ships would be located on 72 acres of prime waterfront valued at $532 million and adjacent to historic districts. Nine acres would go for parking.

Carnival’s cruise ships make 88 landings in Charleston annually and bring 200,000 visitors to town.

Cruise ships burn what’s called “bunker fuel,” a highly polluting sludge-like oil that leaves black streaks on structure in the adjoining historic groups, according to Carrie Agnew, executive director of Communities for Cruise Ship Control and a resident of the historic neighborhood of Ansonborough in downtown, not far from where cruise ships dock. The Charles physician group  calls pollution from the ships a health hazard

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